COD GALBEN: 22-11-2019 ora 17 Intre 17:00 si 20:00 se va semnala intensificări temporare ale vântului, cu rafale de 55 - 65 km/h. in Județul Constanta, Județul Tulcea; COD GALBEN: 22-11-2019 ora 12 Intre 12:00 si 18:00 se va semnala intensificări ale vântului care vor atinge la rafală 55-65 km/h, izolat 70 km/h; la munte vitezele la rafală vor atinge temporar 80-90 km/h in Județul Caraş-Severin;

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SPAIN SOCCER LALIGA

SPAIN SOCCER LALIGA

SPAIN SOCCER LALIGAepa08017110 FC Barcelona's head coach Ernesto Valverde leads a training session at Joan Gamper facilities in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain, 22 November 2019. FC Barcelona will face CD Leganes during their Spanish LaLiga soccer match at Butarque stadium on 23 November 2019. EPA/Enric Fontcuberta

EPA

GERMANY PARTIES CDU

GERMANY PARTIES CDU

GERMANY PARTIES CDUepa08017101 The president of the German Parliament Bundestag Wolfgang Schaeuble (L) and German Chancellor Angela Merkel talk during the Party Congress of the Christian Democratic Union (CDU) in Leipzig, Germany, 22 November 2019. CDU Party Congress takes place from 22 to 23 November 2019. EPA/CLEMENS BILAN

EPA

SWEDEN CURLING

SWEDEN CURLING

SWEDEN CURLINGepa08017095 Scotland's team (L-R) Jennifer Dodds, skip Eve Muirhead, Victoria Wright and Lauren Gray during the Women's semifinal between Scotland and Switzerland at the European Curling Championships in Helsingborg, Sweden, on 22 November 2019. EPA/Jonas Ekstromer/TT SWEDEN OUT

EPA

IRAQ PROTESTS IN BAGHDAD

IRAQ PROTESTS IN BAGHDAD

IRAQ PROTESTS IN BAGHDADepa08017090 Iraqi protesters carry an Iraqi national flag during a protest at the Al-rasheed street, close to the Al Tahrir square, in central Baghdad, Iraq, 22 November 2019. Media reports state that at least three protesters were killed and dozens others were wounded in clashes with anti-riot police forces by Friday evening near the Al-ahrar bridge and Al-rasheed street in central Baghdad. EPA/MURTAJA LATEEF

EPA

FILE TAIWAN ENERGY NUCLEAR WASTE

FILE TAIWAN ENERGY NUCLEAR WASTE

FILE TAIWAN ENERGY NUCLEAR WASTEepa08017085 (FILE) The general view of nuclear storage site on Lanyu Island (Orchid Island) off Taiwan's southeast coast, 09 January 2015 (issued on 22 November 2019). On 22 November 2019, Taiwan announced it will compensate the aborignes Yami people (also called Tao people) on the Lanyu Island for storing nuclear waste on the island. The government will make a one-time payment of 2.55 billion Taiwan dollars (US$83 million) while it will continue to pay islanders 220 million Taiwan dollars (US$7 million) compensation every three years until the storage site is removed. Taiwan built the nuclear waste storage site on Lanyu Island in 1982 to store nuclear waste from Taiwan's three nuclear power plants. The govenrment told islanders it was building a canned fish factory and has secretly stored 100,000 barrels of nuclear waste at the site. EPA/HENRY LIN

EPA

SPAIN CINEMA GIJON FILM FESTIVAL

SPAIN CINEMA GIJON FILM FESTIVAL

SPAIN CINEMA GIJON FILM FESTIVALepa08017081 Bulgarian filmmaker Stephan Komandarev attends a press conference on his movie 'Rounds' at the 57th edition of the Gijon International Film Festival, in Gijon, Asturias, northern Spain, 22 November 2019. The movie competes in the official section of the festival, which runs from 15 to 23 November. EPA/Juan Gonzalez

EPA

PAKISTAN PROTEST INFLATION

PAKISTAN PROTEST INFLATION

PAKISTAN PROTEST INFLATIONepa08017078 Supporters of different political opposition parties shout slogans during a protest against government policies in Lahore, Pakistan, 22 November 2019. The protestors demanded an end to rising inflation and the failure of the government to control the prices of basic commodities. EPA/RAHAT DAR

EPA

A villager is on his way to collect water

A villager is on his way to collect water

A villager is on his way to collect water(191122) -- YICHENG COUNTY, Nov. 22, 2019 (Xinhua) -- A villager is on his way to collect water stored in a mud pit in Nanling Village of Yicheng County, north China's Shanxi Province, July 2, 2019.\r\n As the switch was pulled, water spurted out from 403 meters down under. Nanling Village's very first deep-water well went into service on an early winter morning. In the past, the village, spreading across the ravines of the Zhongtiao Mountains in northern China, had relied solely on mud pits to store its valuable drinking water for centuries.\r\n Haunted by the fear of drought, generations had dreamt of direct access to drinking water but only ended up digging pits on dry grounds, craving for rain and snow water. There was even a saying about the scarcity of drinking water: 'In Nanling, water is as dear as cooking oil.' With the new well, the village's 786 residents no longer have to live at the mercy of Nature, as their ancestors had done. \r\n The preciousness of water in Nanling is highlighted by the fragility of local water security. There was a time when large storage jars were a necessity for every household in the village. Whenever it rained or snowed, the villagers would collect water dripping from the eaves with every container they could manage, and then transfer the garnered water to the jars or pits. On occasions of drought, unfortunately, the only way to get water was by travelling a long distance to the mountain streams.\r\n Back in the 1960s and 1970s, experts had asserted that there hardly existed enough underground water in Nanling, given the village's geology. \r\n Despite that, the struggle for water went on. In 2017, dire water shortage here prompted a discussion on drilling a deep-water well. The whole village responded with active support and donations, hoping the well could solve their water problems once and for all.\r\n By the end of 2018, the village had raised 350,000 yuan (about 50,000 U.S. dollars) to fund the long-awaited well. After paperworks were ready, the drilling began in May 2019. \r\n However, the drilling did not go smooth. At 100 meters under the ground, water only sprung for a few minutes. At 300, water disappeared within a dozen minutes. The drilling team was faced with a dilemma: to dig, or not to dig? The project ran into a cul-de-sac.\r\n Eventually the drilling team decided not to give up. By mid-October, when they bored 403 meters downwards, miracle occurred: underground water ran out at ten cubic meters per hour and for 170 consecutive hours. Villagers were moved to tears of joy at the sight of flowing water.\r\n Soon the water quality report followed: crystal clear and of good quality.\r\n At a completion ceremony for the well-drilling, villagers brought water containers with them and stood in lines before the water pipe. Some couldn't help drinking directly from the pipe. The era of 'water slaves' ended. In the near future, an extended network of pipe water is expected to benefit every household in the village. (Xinhua/Zhan Yan)
Villagers attend a completion ceremony for

Villagers attend a completion ceremony for

Villagers attend a completion ceremony for(191122) -- YICHENG COUNTY, Nov. 22, 2019 (Xinhua) -- Villagers attend a completion ceremony for the drilling of a deep-water well in Nanling Village of Yicheng County, north China's Shanxi Province, Nov. 20, 2019.\r\n As the switch was pulled, water spurted out from 403 meters down under. Nanling Village's very first deep-water well went into service on an early winter morning. In the past, the village, spreading across the ravines of the Zhongtiao Mountains in northern China, had relied solely on mud pits to store its valuable drinking water for centuries.\r\n Haunted by the fear of drought, generations had dreamt of direct access to drinking water but only ended up digging pits on dry grounds, craving for rain and snow water. There was even a saying about the scarcity of drinking water: 'In Nanling, water is as dear as cooking oil.' With the new well, the village's 786 residents no longer have to live at the mercy of Nature, as their ancestors had done. \r\n The preciousness of water in Nanling is highlighted by the fragility of local water security. There was a time when large storage jars were a necessity for every household in the village. Whenever it rained or snowed, the villagers would collect water dripping from the eaves with every container they could manage, and then transfer the garnered water to the jars or pits. On occasions of drought, unfortunately, the only way to get water was by travelling a long distance to the mountain streams.\r\n Back in the 1960s and 1970s, experts had asserted that there hardly existed enough underground water in Nanling, given the village's geology. \r\n Despite that, the struggle for water went on. In 2017, dire water shortage here prompted a discussion on drilling a deep-water well. The whole village responded with active support and donations, hoping the well could solve their water problems once and for all.\r\n By the end of 2018, the village had raised 350,000 yuan (about 50,000 U.S. dollars) to fund the long-awaited well. After paperworks were ready, the drilling began in May 2019. \r\n However, the drilling did not go smooth. At 100 meters under the ground, water only sprung for a few minutes. At 300, water disappeared within a dozen minutes. The drilling team was faced with a dilemma: to dig, or not to dig? The project ran into a cul-de-sac.\r\n Eventually the drilling team decided not to give up. By mid-October, when they bored 403 meters downwards, miracle occurred: underground water ran out at ten cubic meters per hour and for 170 consecutive hours. Villagers were moved to tears of joy at the sight of flowing water.\r\n Soon the water quality report followed: crystal clear and of good quality.\r\n At a completion ceremony for the well-drilling, villagers brought water containers with them and stood in lines before the water pipe. Some couldn't help drinking directly from the pipe. The era of 'water slaves' ended. In the near future, an extended network of pipe water is expected to benefit every household in the village. (Xinhua/Zhan Yan)
Aerial photo taken on July 4 2019 shows the

Aerial photo taken on July 4 2019 shows the

Aerial photo taken on July 4 2019 shows the(191122) -- YICHENG COUNTY, Nov. 22, 2019 (Xinhua) -- Aerial photo taken on July 4, 2019 shows the drilling site of a deep-water well in Nanling Village of Yicheng County, north China's Shanxi Province.\r\n As the switch was pulled, water spurted out from 403 meters down under. Nanling Village's very first deep-water well went into service on an early winter morning. In the past, the village, spreading across the ravines of the Zhongtiao Mountains in northern China, had relied solely on mud pits to store its valuable drinking water for centuries.\r\n Haunted by the fear of drought, generations had dreamt of direct access to drinking water but only ended up digging pits on dry grounds, craving for rain and snow water. There was even a saying about the scarcity of drinking water: 'In Nanling, water is as dear as cooking oil.' With the new well, the village's 786 residents no longer have to live at the mercy of Nature, as their ancestors had done. \r\n The preciousness of water in Nanling is highlighted by the fragility of local water security. There was a time when large storage jars were a necessity for every household in the village. Whenever it rained or snowed, the villagers would collect water dripping from the eaves with every container they could manage, and then transfer the garnered water to the jars or pits. On occasions of drought, unfortunately, the only way to get water was by travelling a long distance to the mountain streams.\r\n Back in the 1960s and 1970s, experts had asserted that there hardly existed enough underground water in Nanling, given the village's geology. \r\n Despite that, the struggle for water went on. In 2017, dire water shortage here prompted a discussion on drilling a deep-water well. The whole village responded with active support and donations, hoping the well could solve their water problems once and for all.\r\n By the end of 2018, the village had raised 350,000 yuan (about 50,000 U.S. dollars) to fund the long-awaited well. After paperworks were ready, the drilling began in May 2019. \r\n However, the drilling did not go smooth. At 100 meters under the ground, water only sprung for a few minutes. At 300, water disappeared within a dozen minutes. The drilling team was faced with a dilemma: to dig, or not to dig? The project ran into a cul-de-sac.\r\n Eventually the drilling team decided not to give up. By mid-October, when they bored 403 meters downwards, miracle occurred: underground water ran out at ten cubic meters per hour and for 170 consecutive hours. Villagers were moved to tears of joy at the sight of flowing water.\r\n Soon the water quality report followed: crystal clear and of good quality.\r\n At a completion ceremony for the well-drilling, villagers brought water containers with them and stood in lines before the water pipe. Some couldn't help drinking directly from the pipe. The era of 'water slaves' ended. In the near future, an extended network of pipe water is expected to benefit every household in the village. (Xinhua/Zhan Yan)
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